Feature Article: National Food Banks and How They Help

By Sheila Buck

Food banks supply low-income families with the food they need to survive. The National Food Bank, also known as, Feeding America, works with several other local food banks to make sure that families stay fed and children stay healthy. The National Food Bank and the smaller food banks share a close relationship, and work together to keep families fed.

The local food bank:

  • Obtain food from the local businesses and farmers.
  • Receive donations from local corporations and individuals who donate. They use these donations to help low-income families.
  • Receive food from Feeding America and distribute it to low-income individuals in their community.
  • Hold a close relationship with the National Food Bank and the other local food banks.
  • Promote food safety.
  • Work hard, on a local level, to set up better government programs for families and individuals in need.

The National Food Bank:

  • Obtain food from large manufacturers and the government.
  • Acquire donations from larger corporations and individual donors.
  • Distribute food to local food banks.
  • Hold a close relationship with the other food banks.
  • Promote food safety.
  • Work hard, on a national level, to set up better government programs for families and individuals in need.

Feeding America is a respectable charity. The National Food Bank distributes food to the many local food banks in the United States. The local food banks then distribute this food to soup kitchens and food cupboards. These food cupboards and soup kitchens feed low-income families and individuals, and help them stay healthy.

Resource:

Feeding America

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Sheila Buck is the single mom of two teenage boys. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Clinical Psychology. Sheila is a freelance writer, and also writes books and short stories in her spare time. Sheila also writes for Frugal is Fabulous!.

Feature Article: What is WIC and How It is Helpful

By Sheila Buck

WIC is a federal nutrition program that helps pregnant and nursing moms,  as well as, infants and children up to age five. This program helps  families to meet their children’s nutritional needs, and offers other services.  Listed below are some helpful facts about the WIC program.

  • This program offers nutritional information and education to pregnant women, nursing moms, and parents of infants and small children.
  • WIC helps their clients find appropriate health care.
  • This program also helps their clients to find other services in their community.
  • Offers breast feeding education and support.
  • WIC gives voucher’s for different foods and dairy products. Anything you purchase using these vouchers has to be WIC approved. They give you a list the foods they allow.
  • Sometimes they give their client’s vouchers for the local farmer’s market.
  • WIC also gives recipients vouchers that can be used at farmer’s markets for fresh fruits and vegetables. (Updated 1/1/2017)

Foods you can get by using your WIC voucher’s:

  • Cereal
  • Milk
  • Peanut butter
  • Infant formula
  • Baby cereals
  • Cheese
  • Juice
  • Eggs
  • Breads
  • Dried beans and peas
  • Baby food
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables (Updated 1/1/2017)
  • Canned fish (Updated 1/1/2017)
  • Tofu (Updated 1/1/2017)
  • Soy-based beverages (Updated 1/1/2017)

WIC is a very helpful program if you are expecting a baby or have infants and children under five years of age. The services offered help keep children, pregnant and nursing moms, and other mothers healthy. This program is for low- income and medium- income families. To locate the WIC program closest to you, contact your doctor’s office, search online or look in your phone book.

Reference:

California Department of Public Health

USDA

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Sheila Buck is the single mom of two teenage boys. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Clinical Psychology. Sheila is a freelance writer, and also writes books and short stories in her spare time. Sheila also writes for Frugal is Fabulous!

Feature Article: What is a Soup Kitchen and What is Usually Served at One?

By Sheila Buck

A soup kitchen is a place where food is served to the hungry for free or for a low price. These kitchens are usually open on week days, but not on weekends. The staff is usually made up of volunteers. They set up the tables and chairs, cook the meals and clean up afterward.

The majority of soup kitchens receive their food from food banks, government commodity distribution programs, community retail outlets and community food drives.  Some offer other services as well, such as community resource referrals, vouchers, school supplies for children and bags of food to send home with individuals.

When the soup kitchens first started, soup and bread were served. Times have changed and they now offer a variety of foods. Some foods that may be served at your local soup kitchen include:

  • Pasta and sauce
  • Different breads
  • Soups and stews
  • Fresh or canned fruits
  • Fresh or canned vegetables
  • Casseroles
  • Milk, coffee and juice
  • Turkey with all the fixings (usually for a holiday meal)
  • Chicken
  • Rice
  • Potatoes
  • Pork
  • Roasts
  • Desserts like cookies or cake

If you or your family are having a hard time keeping food in the house, eating at a local soup kitchen a couple of times a week can be helpful. You will receive a nutritious meal in a friendly environment. You can find a soup kitchen in your area by looking in the phone book or searching online. Sometimes there is more than one soup kitchen per area.

References:

Wikipedia: Soup Kitchen

Encyclopedia.com: Soup Kitchens

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Sheila Buck is the single mom of two teenage boys. She has a Bachelor’s Degree in Clinical Psychology. Sheila is a freelance writer, and also writes books and short stories in her spare time. Sheila also writes for Frugal is Fabulous!.